BANTU ROSETTA STONES PART C

 

indelible evidence

 

THE KISWAHILI-BANTU RESEARCH UNIT

FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF THE ANCIENT EGYPTIAN LANGUAGE

  

Example 1

 

Budge 331a, Samuel Mercer 153, James P Allen, 460, Faulkner 120

 

Ancient Egyptian: MTmale, man

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: MTU, person, man, male (with the correct symbol)

 

Luvale-Bantu: MUTU, person, man,

 

Researched by FERG SOMO © August 7th 2008

 

MTU

Researched by Somo © August 27th 2008

 

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Strictly Bantu and Ancient Egyptian Cognates

Near Consonantal Matching

 

I hope you find these typically Bantu terms absorbing. They all deal with the human touch. You may be acquainted with some of the examples shown in previous investigations.

 

From these investigations, it is becoming increasingly clear in the scheme of things that the Kemetic language consists of substantial amounts of vocabularies belonging to Bantu languages. The Afro-Asiatic language does not have a significant input into the Kemetic language as the Bantu languages of Africa do.

 

I have only seen a few unconvincing examples, so much so that it would be extremely difficult to make a realistic claim that the Afro-Asiatic language, despite being an African language could match up with the vocabularies discussed in this investigation. The precise meanings of these words examined may only differ slightly with the Kemetic skeletal consonants of the language in as much as a consonant here or there may not be quite fitting, otherwise a click fit is maintained giving a clear sound/meaning relationship.

 

For a long time I had overlooked this important word and finally decided to tackle it to see whether the words MTU, MUTU, or MUNTU were part of the Ancient Egyptian vocabulary. To my surprise the words are part of the Ancient Egyptian language. I had to unravel skeletal consonants to see whether I could find the words MTU or MUTU wrapped up within the consonants, not only that I had to find out the plurals of words relating to these terms. My breakthrough came when I examined the set of hieroglyphics taken from Budge page 331a which shows a male man with the unmistakeable symbol; pardon me here, the phallus! The symbol for a ‘man’ also appears in Samuel A. B. Mercer’s book page 153. It also appears in James P Allen, page 460 and in Faulkner page 120

 

The distinguishing symbol seen herebelonging to a male person, shows the vital force of man, and has the consonants mt. It is a powerful reminder that the Ancient Egyptian language is an African language and owes its origin to the Bantu languages of Africa. The Afro-Asiatic word for male or man in the Berber language is given as ‘balul’- the penis and does not fit the Ancient Egyptian or Bantu model. I have not come across the Bantu term mtu in any other language which defines a man and to me this word stands out as being truly unique between the Ancient Egyptian and Bantu languages.

 

What we observe here is that the fundamental word for a person has not changed and still remains intact in the Ancient Egyptian and Bantu languages right to this day. There are many ways of pronouncing the word for a person in Bantu languages. Thus mtu, mutu, muntu all define a person in Bantu languages.

 

By all accounts the Kiswahili-Bantu word MTU defines a person, a human being, a man. The word UTU defines human nature, humanity, manhood, membership in the human race. As an example in the ChiTonga-Bantu language MUNTU means man, human being, person. U-NTU defines, being, manhood, semen, or sexual seed of the male. This is similar to the Kiswahili-Bantu word UTU, just discussed. 

 

However the Ancient Egyptian depiction of the hieroglyphics uses the word MTU or MUTU to define a male or a man as may be seen here:  MTmale, man

 

In Bantu languages the word MTU or MUTU could mean either a male or a female person. The distinguishing difference between male and female is quite obvious, and the Ancient Egyptians showed this by using the phallus symbol. Thus by observing the hieroglyphics, it instantly distinguishes in the mind that it is a male person, a MTU who is the subject.

[mtu + the male symbol] → [mtu +]

 

I would now like to examine the following set of hieroglyphics which proves unmistakeably that the words MTU, MUTU were part of the Ancient Egyptian vocabulary. Consider the following:

 

Example 2

Budge 331a

MTseed, offspring, semen, progeny

 

This is given as MTO in the Luganda-Bantu language. The word is derived from the adjective -TO which means young, small, not fully formed. MTO means a child or offspring. The Kiswahili-Bantu language uses the word MTOTO which is explored next with a different set of hieroglyphics. See Proto-Bantu table

 

 

MAIN

LH (A)

little, small; young

7185

 

petit; jeune

 

Total Distribution:

Regions: 2: Ce NE

Zones: 5: D E F G J

MAIN

7185

LH

A

little, small; young

 

 

Example 3

Faulkner 121

 

MTWTseed, progeny, semen

 

The consonants spell out the word MTOWTO, pronounced as MTOTO in the Kiswahili-Bantu language. The word MTOTO means the early stages of development, produce, production, that which is born in a given place, home born, indigenous, a native, a child, offspring, young person, descendent. TOTO also means a big fine child, or offspring. The fruit bud on a banana stalk is called a TOTO.

 

It is becoming increasingly clear that the words MTU, MUTU, MTOTO which are all Bantu words were used in the vocabulary of the Ancient Egyptians. For such a fundamental word, for a person to be witnessed as being existent in the Ancient Egyptian language is truly enlightening.

 

A variation of the above set of hieroglyphics is included in Faulkner on page 120, 

 

Example 4

Faulkner 120

Ancient Egyptian: mtbolus

Sir Alan Gardiner takes the bolus given by Faulkner, seen here to be an egg, which represents the seed containing a developing embryo. This is clearly connected with the male reproductive organ, the testicle. Hence the word representing the consonants mt would be the Bantu word mto.

 

Example 5

Budge 331, b

 

Ancient Egyptian: mt chief, governor, president

 

Kiswahili-Bantu, (other Bantu): mtu, moto, moti, muata

 

The symbol shows the status of a male person in charge, hence a chief, or governor. The Kiswahili-Bantu word for a man is mtu. The word mtu when used in an emphatic sense means a person of rank, importance or consideration. The equivalent word in the Lingala-Bantu language is moto, a person. Here too moto when pronounced in an emphatic sense means, head, or chief. In the Luvale-Bantu language, the word mu-ata means an elder, master, or lord.

 

The next example is also connected to a man and shows a different set of hieroglyphics.

  

Example 6

Faulkner 296, Budge 828b

                                                                                  

Ancient Egyptian: tpman, person, individual, man or woman

 

This set of hieroglyphics is the epitome of what defines the unique physical qualities of a human being, a mere person, a complete man, or woman, one born in ones birthday suit!, born in a naked state and defines the state of nudity, and nakedness together with  the relevant sexual organs of a person.

 

The word which describes this scenario of a mere person is the Kiswahili-Bantu word tupu which is derived from Proto-Bantu. The adjective given as –tupu have the following meanings, bare, bald, empty, naked, nude, by itself (themselves), exactly, simply. The word utupu defines nakedness, nudity and the sexual organs of a person.

 

Thus one says in Kiswahili-Bantu language ‘MTU MTUPU’, a mere man or person

 

This may be shown as: bare, bald, sexual orgns

                                                       ↓

            TUPU ]→M+TU M+TUPU →A mere man

                     ↓

                  MTU

The Ancient Egyptians also used the word tupu seen here as a bald head to define the head as being the topmost bald part of a person or thing. The word tupu have the additional Ancient Egyptian meanings as, the head, the top of anything, point, tip or the beginning of a journey. Refer to Faulkner 296, Budge 828a, b.  

 Proto-Bantu Table

 

(I, A)

alone, empty, vain

4837

 

seul, vide, vain

 

Total Distribution:

Regions: 5: NW SW Ce NE SE

Zones: 10: B C D E F G K L P R

MAIN

4837

 

I, A

alone, empty, vain

B C D E G L P

DER

5168

H

V

make mistake

L

DER

5171

HH

I, A

only; empty; vain

D E F G K L R P

 

See also:

 

4838

 

V

finish

L

 

 

 

 

   

Example 7

Gardiner, 601, 456, D52, D53, Budge 848 a

 

Ancient Egyptian: tjay man, male

 

Shona-Bantu: jaya = young man of marriageable age

Kiswahili-Bantu: m-ja = a person, a newcomer

 

This is an interesting set of hieroglyphics. The Shona-Bantu word jaya means a young man of marriageable age. The Kiswahili-Bantu equivalent word is m-ja, a man. The etymology of the word is derived from the Southern-Soto-Bantu language by the use of the verb tjha, or cha, which means, to burn. It is also related to the Kiswahili-Bantu word ja, come and by prefixing m-, one obtains m-ja, one who comes, a newcomer, a person.  Generally in Bantu languages the word for, ‘burn and new’ are synonymous. The idea behind this concept is that burnt grass produces new growth. Thus –tjha also means new, fresh, or young and the word se-tjha formed by the prefix se- means young people, or youth. Mo-tjha with the prefix mo-, the one who is, means a young person. The little duckling on its own pronounced as tja would mean a nestling, newly come or a child. Clearly this is equivalent to Bantu –tjha which means new, fresh or young.

 

THE PLURAL OF MTU

 

The two examples shown below demonstrate that the Ancient Egyptians used the plural of MTU as WATU.  

 

Example 8

Budge 230b

 

pawtbeings, men

In the Kiswahili-Bantu language, Pawt translates as PA-WATU, the place of the people, men.  In this case the Ancient Egyptian scribe chose the plural form of Mtu as WATU instead of ATU, both forms are acceptable. Note the symbol of a female person is excluded from the hieroglyphics and refers specifically to men as seen by the male personshown as the determinative.

 

In the above example it is tempting to use the Bantu plural prefix Ba- which means they, them, these people. It is also given in the Ancient Egyptian language as, bpeople, see Budge 197a.

 

So how can the consonant P, in the Ancient Egyptian word above be explained? Could P be interchanged with B? Further investigation yield the following Kiswahili-Bantu word Pa, which means to be at some definite place. This word is closely connected to the Ancient Egyptian word Pa, to be, to exist given as, paBudge 230b. To exist means to have place.

 

Analysis:

 

The Ancient Egyptian word for mankind would be given in the Kiswahili-Bantu form PA-WATU which means where the people are, or at the place of people, the peopled place or the population of people in a place. Since the determinative of a man is shown, PA-WATU would signify the place of men or just men.

 

Compare this with a different form for the word people in the Oshindonka-Bantu language PA+ANTU→ PAANTU, the people.

 

I have included a table of plurals which are currently in use in some Bantu languages.

 

Table of Plural

 

           

 

    Bantu Language

 

 

 

          

    Words for a Person

 

      People, Mankind

 

          Plural forms

 

 

    Kiswahili-Bantu

 

 

              Mtu

 

          Watu, Atu

 

    Bemba Bantu

 

 

             Muntu

 

             Bantu

 

     Lingala-Bantu

 

            

              Moto

            

             Bato

 

   Oshindonka-Bantu

 

 

  OMuntu

 

             Aantu

 

        Zulu-Bantu

 

 

             Umuntu

 

            ABantu

 

       Luvale-Bantu

 

 

             Mutu

 

              Vatu

 

    Rukwangali-Bantu

 

 

             Muntu

 

             Vantu

 

     Setswana-Bantu

 

 

             Motho

 

             Batho

 

         Tsong-Bantu

 

 

             Munhu

 

              Vanhu

 

        Southern-Soto

 

 

              Motho

 

Batho, Bantu, black        races south of the equator

 

     Chichewa-Bantu

 

 

             Munthu

 

            Anthu

 

 Ruknyankore-Rukiga-

 Bantu

 

 

             Omuntu

 

           Abantu

 

        Lega-Bantu

 

 

              Monto

 

              Banto

 

   Thimbukushu-Bantu

 

 

 

             Munu

 

              Hanu

 

       Kuria-Bantu

 

 

            Omonto

 

             Abanto

 

       Shona-Bantu

 

 

            Munhu

 

               Vanhu

Example 9

Faulkner 59, Budge 161a

Ancient Egyptian: wpwthousehold, crowd, census

Kiswahili-Bantu: wapo-watu, wapowatu, the people who are present here,

The Kiswahili-Bantu word which fits the Ancient Egyptian consonants wpwt consists of wa+po+watu, giving wapowatu, which means they, the people who are present here. Wapo is a verb form, they are here.Example 10

Budge 303a

 

mnhyoung man, boy, youth

 

Shona-Bantu: munhu, person

 

The Shona-Bantu language provides us with the word munhu which means a person. Observe the word in the table above. Thus a person could be either male or female. The determinant of the male  implies that the subject is a male, hence a young man, a boy. Contrast the above set of hieroglyphics with the one seen below showing a female person. It would appear that the scribe who carved out the setting inserted a male figure instead of a female figure. In other words the scribe made a mistake. However we do know that the setting should show a female person as seen here, since we are given the feminine ending t.

 Example 11

Budge 303b

 

mnh-tgirl, maiden

 

Shona-Bantu: munhu, person

 

The Shona-Bantu word for a person is munhu and munhu-kadzi is a female person, kadzi being the feminine suffix.

 

There are many Bantu feminine suffixes. The most appropriate one here is from the Siswati-Bantu language which has -kati shortened to –ati. Thus a bovine animal is given as inkhomo and a cow becomes inkhomo+ati, giving inkhomati.

 

On further observations the Ancient Egyptian word mnh could very well be the Kiswahili-Bantu word muana, which means a child, boy or girl. However the Ancient Egyptian ending h presents a slight problem as the Kiswahili-Bantu language does not have this ending except for muanaye or muanae which means his child.

 

 Could the ending –ye be the equivalent for -he? Or could the Ancient Egyptian pronunciation be given as muanah, with the ending nah equivalent to just na?

 

If this can be shown, then this form of the word muanah would be the acceptable word.

 

Example 12

Budge 306b

 

mtycompatriot

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: mtuye, person belonging to him, a compatriot, his fellow person

 

It is interesting to observe again that the Ancient Egyptians used the word mtu, which means a person. Here again the word appears and describes a compatriot. A compatriot is described as a fellow countryman or a person belonging to him from the same country, which gives mtuye, or mtuyake in the Kiswahili-Bantu language. Notice the symbol denoting a foreign land. Here we observe the Ancient Egyptian ending in y. This is a shortened form used for yake his, hers, it.

Thus ye = yake, belonging to him. As an example babaye would mean his father.

  

Example 13

Faulkner 82, Budge 215a, b

 

bwamighty one, lord, chief, magnate

 

The Kiswahili-Bantu word BWA-NA seems to convey similar meanings to the Ancient Egyptian word, despite the Kiswahili-Bantu ending NA. Bwana means sir, master, lord, owner, chief, an important person, a powerful person.

 Example 14

 Faulkner 101

 

Ancient Egyptian: mayfetus

 

Kiswahili-Bantu:  mayai = eggs, seeds, testicle (consisting of two eggs), embryos

M’yai would mean the egg.

Example 15

Faulkner 60, Budge 164a

Ancient Egyptian: wmt mass of men

  Kiswahili-Bantu: waume-tu, mass of men, men only, husbands

This word is derived from the adjective and noun ume. Some of its meanings include anything big, firm, strong, thick, solid, manliness, potency, masculinity.  Muume or mume defines a male man, a husband and waume is the collective word for husbands or men. The ending tu in the Kiswahili-Bantu language means exactly, nothing more or nothing less. Thus waume-tu means a mass of men or husbands only. As mentioned the word ume signifies things which are strong, solid, firm and it is for this reason that the wall is shown as the determinant.

Example 16

Gardiner 539, Faulkner 63

  

Ancient Egyptians: wndjwt subjects, associates

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: wenieji-wote = owners, inhabitants, citizens, subjects

 

By using the Kiswahili-Bantu language the consonants wndjwt may be de-agglutinated into the following parts: wa+enie+ji+wa+ote. In this instance wa means all those who, enye or enie derived from Proto-Bantu, jene, self, same, jenie, jenye owner. –Ji means habitual, wa again means those who are, ote means all, the entirety. Hence the word which describes the subjects of a country is derived from the Kiswahili-Bantu word wenieji or wenyeji, the owners, which include householders, citizens, inhabitants or subjects of a town or country. The form may be condensed from wa+enie+ji+wa+ote to weniejiwote which means all the subjects. Wote means all, the whole.

 

Example 17

 Gardiner 554, Budge 61b

 

Ancient Egyptian: inm skin of human being

 

Bemba-Bantu (other Bantu):  niama, nyama, nama, meat, flesh with skin

 

The Bantu root nama, nyama, niama means an animal, beast, body, meat, flesh and skin, substance. In the Bemba-Bantu language the term iniama means the meat, and is commonly used. The Proto-Bantu form is given as nyama or nama.

 

Example 18

Budge 62a

 

Ancient Egyptian: inmw  skins, human beings

 

General Bantu, (Cushitic-Bantu) inama-wao, wao = those who are human beings

 

From the definitions given above iniama means, an animal, flesh or skin, hence the Ancient Egyptians used this word to denote a human being. Indeed in the Cushitic-Oromo language, nama is the word used for body, people, human being, fellow countryman. In the Shona-Bantu language unyama is the word used for human skin.

 Example 19

Gardiner 555, Faulkner 32

 

Ancient Egyptian: itfather

 Shona-Bantu: tata = father, my father

Southern-Soto-Bantu: n-tate = father, my father

 

Diop describes the word for father as yitt which means ‘beat, discipline’ which could mean bringing up a child or training a child. The proto-Bantu word for father is tata.

Chi-Chewa-Bantu, father, my father, tate. Refer to Proto-Bantu table.

 

Proto-Bantu Table

 

 

pčre, mon pčre

 

Total Distribution:

Regions: 5: NW SW Ce NE SE

Zones: 14: A B C E G H J K L M N P R S

 

MAIN

2806

LLH

N 1a/2

father, my father

A B C E H J K L M P S

COMP

9227

LLHHHH

N 1a

father-in-law

J L M

COMP

9228

LLHLLL

N

my chief

J L

INC

2807

LLH

N 1a/2

my father

 

INC

2809

LLH

N 1a/2

my father

 

VAR

2808

LLH

N 1a/2

father, my father

A G K L N P R S

 

 

Example 20

Faulkner P 312, Gardiner 602b

 

Ancient Egyptian: dmto pronounce, proclaim, name, mention, be renowned

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: domo = large lip: Kiswahili-Bantu: domo = words, language speech, talk, conversation, brag, boasting

 

Shona-Bantu: doma = call a list of names, speak relevantly

 

 

MAIN

LL (N 3/4)

lip, mouth, beak

 

 

lčvre, bouche, bec

 

Total Distribution:

Regions: 5: NW SW Ce NE SE

Zones: 11: C D E F G J K L M N S

 

MAIN

1110

LL

N 3/4

lip, mouth, beak

C D E F G J K L M N S

DER

6485

H

V

suck; peck

C J

INC

1111

LL

N 3/4

mouth

 

 

 

This is an interesting word which is derived from Proto-Bantu word domo, lip, mouth, entry. The Kiswahili-Bantu word domo means a large lip, beak, protuberance, a projection, a thing resembling a beak of a bird, an overhanging. Hence the word domo is associated with the mouth and from this one derives its additional Kiswahili-Bantu meanings of talk, speech, conversation, gossip. Indeed in the Shona-Bantu language, doma means to call a list of names, speak relevantly. It is interesting to observe that the knife seen here  resembles the beak of a bird, in other words it has a pointed or sharp protuberance. The consequence of this is shown by the hieroglyphics seen here: dm, be sharp. This would be considered to be domo, a sharp point or protuberance.

 

Example 21

Faulkner 111, Gardiner 569, U23 page 518

 

Ancient Egyptian: mr  sick man, be ill

 

Kiswahili-Bantu, (other Bantu): muere, muele, mwele,, a sick person

 

 

The etymology of the word is derived from the word –uele which means sickness or illness and derived from Proto-Bantu beed, be ill.

 Proto-Bantu Table

MAIN

H (V)

be ill

119

 

ętre malade

 

Total Distribution:

Regions: 3: NW SW Ce

Zones: 7: B C D H K L R

MAIN

119

H

V

be ill

B C D H K L

 

 

The Ancient Egyptians did not use the consonant l but instead used the consonant r. Thus consonants l and r may be interchanged without loss in meaning. This is also true in the Shona-Bantu and Kiswahili-Bantu languages. The Shona-Bantu language does not use the consonant l but chooses to use the consonant r as may be seen in the word for a sick person. This is in keeping with the Ancient Egyptian language. The Shona-Bantu word for a sick person is given by mu-hwere, or mu-rwere. Compare the pronunciations of the word for a sick person in the Kiswahili-Bantu language, muele, mwele or muere. It is becoming clear that the Ancient Egyptians used the Bantu word mu-ere or muele for a sick person.

 

CHILD, MOTHER, NURSE

 

Example 22 

Faulkner 183

 

Ancient Egyptian: kha little, be young

 

Bantu diminutive prefix: ka-, ki-

 

The Proto-Bantu word for little or small is given as kee or ke. Refer to table. In present day Bantu languages the prefix ka- or ki- are used before nouns to signify diminutive forms. As an example nama means an animal, ka-nama, a small animal. 

 

Proto-Bantu Table

MAIN

HL (A)

little, small

7984

 

petit; peu

 

Total Distribution:

Regions: 5: NW SW Ce NE SE

Zones: 13: B C D F G H J K L M N P S

MAIN

7984

HL

A

little, small

B C D H J L M

 

 

Example 23

Gardiner 69 Faulkner 116 James P Allen 460 Budge 321 b

 

Ancient Egyptian: ms child, 

Kiswahili-Bantu: mzao (msao) = A child, offspring, descendant

 

Note the sound z in the Kiswahili-Bantu language is equivalent to the sound s in the Ancient Egyptian language. The Kiswahili-Bantu word mzao or msao means a child, offspring or descendent. The etymology of the word is derived from the Kiswahili-Bantu language. The concept behind the word, zaa or saa, depending on pronunciation, is one of emergence. It represents the vital stages of reproduction, giving birth, producing offspring or bearing fruit. Refer to Proto-Bantu table below.

 

MAIN

3158

LH

N 1/2

girl at puberty; woman; woman lately given birth

C E F G J K L M N P R S

INC

3156

LH

N 1/2

woman

 

INC

3157

LH

N 1/2

give birth lately

 

 

Example 24

Faulkner 116

 

Ancient Egyptian: ms-wt (collective) children, offspring

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: mizao-wote = children, offspring

  

The plural of mzao, a child is mizao, children or offspring. The collective plural may be given as mizao-wote, which means all, everyone the complete lot, or set of children or offspring.

Example 25

Faulkner 116

 

Ancient Egyptian: ms-tmother

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: mzaa (msaa) = one who gives birth, a mother

 

This is given in Kiswahili-Bantu as mzaa or msaa, one who begets or gives birth, a mother. The feminine ending t may be given as ati. Refer to gender nouns coming soon.

 

Example 26

Budge 322a

 

Ancient Egyptian: ms a baby

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: mzao = baby, child, offspring, descendent

 

Example 27

  (different form of hiero)

  

Ancient Egyptian: ms child

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: mzao (msao), a child, offspring, descendant

 

Example 28

Faulkner 138

Budge 388a

 

Ancient Egyptian: nkhn child, baby

 

Shona-Bantu, (other Bantu):  kana, small child

Venda-Bantu: hana, child  

 

VAR

2233

H

N 12

child

 

This word for a child is derived from the Proto-Bantu root –ana which means small, young. Bantu languages attach different prefixes to the adjective –ana to derive the word for a child. Examples of this may be seen by examining the Kiswahili-Bantu word for a child, given by the prefix mu- to give the word mu-ana. Likewise the Shona-Bantu word for a child attaches the diminutive prefix ka- to derive the word kana, small child. It follows in this instance that the Ancient Egyptian word must have been derived from the Proto-Bantu root –ana, which means small, young. By inserting the Ancient Egyptian diminutive prefix nka-, which is similar to the Shona-Bantu diminutive ka- one may derive the Ancient Egyptian word for a child as nka+ana to give nkana.

Example 29

Faulkner 230 Gardiner 514, T22

Ancient Egyptian: snbrother

Shona-Bantu zana, big child

 Refer to the Proto-Bantu table above. The Shona-Bantu word zana defines a big child, male or female. In the Kiswahili-Bantu language the word zaana derived from za means to bear offspring. It also means to breed together. Moreover the word usena means, friend, relationship, being of the same family.

Example 30

Ancient Egyptian: sn-tsister

The feminine form seen above could be reconstructed as zana-ti in a similar way to the example given as inkhomo, a cow becomes inkhomo+ati, giving inkhomati. As another example in the Northern Sotho-Bantu language, morwa means a son and morwa-di means daughter.

 

Example 31

Faulkner 166

 

Ancient Egyptian: hwnchild, young man

 

Shona-Bantu: hwana = young thing, seedling

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: muana, mwana, young child 

 

This example is closely related to the above example. The root of the Ancient Egyptian word is derived from the Bantu adjective ana which means small, young. From this one derives the Shona-Bantu words hwana and Kiswahili-Bantu word muana, or mwana

 

Example 32

Faulkner 150, Budge 428 a

 

Ancient Egyptian: rr to nurse a child, bring up, nurse

 

Shona-Bantu, (other Bantu): rera = lera = lea, to bring up a child, nurse, educate

 

In the Kiswahili-Bantu language the word lea means bring up a child, nurse, educate. The word is a shortened form and begins with the consonant l instead of r. The Shona-Bantu equivalent word rera has the precise consonantal form as the Ancient Egyptian word and give similar meanings. So does the Kurea-Bantu word rera. The Oshindonga-Bantu language from Namibia gives the word as lela with the double consonants l, whilst the Lugand-Bantu language gives it as lera, having a mixture of consonants l and r. It would appear that the Ancient Egyptian word with the double consonants rr follows the Shona-Bantu and Kurea-Bantu forms of the word rera giving an exact match in sound and meaning.

 

Example 33

Gardiner 518 U23, Faulkner 220

Ancient Egyptian: smr friend, courtier

Shona-Bantu, shamwari, shamuari, friend

Example 34

Budge 323b

 

Ancient Egyptian: ms chief, prince

 

Kiswahili-Bantu; mzsee = msee = an elder, chief, headman

 

The possible root is derived from the word saa or zaa, give birth, hence a chief is one who is an elder, so having given birth to many children.  

 

The Kiswahili-Bantu word mzee or msee means an elder, a person of old age, one who is a senior or a headman of a group of people.

 

Example 35

Faulkner 138

 

Ancient Egyptian: nkhkhbe old, old age

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: kuukuu, aged, old, worn out

 

This is given as kuukuu. The Ancient Egyptian form would be n-kuukuu, formed by the prefix n.

 

 WORK

 

Example 36

Gardiner 453, D 28

 

Ancient Egyptian: ka-t  work, labour or toil

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: kazi = work, labour

 

Proto-Bantu table

 

DER

412

HH

N 7

work

B C

DER

413

HL

N (7/8)

work

B C H

DER

9037

HL

N 1

worker

C

REF

414

HL

N (7/8)

work

 

 

The Kiswahili-Bantu word kazi, derived from Proto-Bantu cadi fits the description ka-zi which means, work, labour, toil. The ending in Ancient Egyptian is t. It would appear that there has been an interchange in the endings between the Ancient Egyptian word ka-ti and the Kiswahili-Bantu word ka-zi. However the interchange between the endings –ti and –zi may be explained by considering other Bantu languages to see whether such an exchange is possible. As an example the word for a goat in the Kiswahili-Bantu language is mbu-zi. The same word in the Tsonga-Bantu language is given as mbu-ti. Thus we see a relationship between –ti and –zi endings. Hence the Ancient Egyptian word ka-ti is similar to the Kiswahili-Bantu word ka-zi. The etymology of the word is derived from the word kaa which in the Kiswahili-Bantu language means to endure, overcome, pick up a load carry, covey. Its proto-Bantu form is cadi, work.

 

Example 37

Gardiner 569, Budge 311a

 

Ancient Egyptian: mr-t serfs, slaves

 

Sesouto-Bantu:  mo-ruuoa(ote) =  all slaves, serfs

 

The three consonants mr-t, refer to serfs or slaves and include the feminine collective ending in t. The Kiswahili-Bantu word –ote is used here as a collective and means, all, the entire lot.

 

The word for a slave formed by the consonants mr may be derived from the Sesuto-Bantu language. The word mo-ruuoa means a slave. As a point of interest, notice the amount of vowels the word consists of. The etymology of mo-ruuoa is derived from the verb rua which means, to gain, to earn, to own, to be rich, to possess. Thus the three consonants mr-t gives mo-ruuoa + ote. This is a common way of expressing plurality in the Ancient Egyptian language and will be discussed later. Thus plurality is formed from a singular noun mo-ruuoa a slave in this case together with ote, all, all the ones, the entire lot, all of them.

The history of forming the plurality in this way may be studied in the book on the Adventures of English by Melvin Bragg, page 269.

The singular word for servant, slave, or peasant is shown by the hieroglyphics below:

 

Example 38

Budge311a

 

Ancient Egyptian: MR servant, peasant, dependent, slave

Sesouto-Bantu: mo-ruuoa = slave

HOLDING, EMBRACING

Example 39

Budge 614a

 

Ancient-Egyptian: skh grasp, hold

 

Kiswahili-Bantu, (other Bantu): shika, hold fast, catch, grip, arrest

 

The Kiswahili-Bantu word shika means, hold fast, grip, grasp.

 

Example 40

Faulkner 241, Budge 693 a

 

 Ancient Egyptian: skhn to embrace, contain or hold each other

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: shikana, hold each other, embrace

 

The Kiswahili-Bantu word shika+na consists of the word shika, hold firmly, and na, with.  The meaning would be to hold or embrace.

 

 

Example 41

Budge 531 a

 

Ancient Egyptian: khm to embrace

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: kama = to embrace, to hold, to contain, to squeeze

 

The etymology of the word given by the consonants khm is derived from the Kiswahili-Bantu language. Refer to the Proto-Bantu table below. The word kama means, to squeeze or hold with the hands. It also means to embrace. Thus ka- means to take or carry in the hand, and –ama means so that it ‘stays firmly’ in the hand, hence the word kama. The proto-Bantu form is kam, squeeze. In the Luvale Bantu language kama means clasp, hold in the hand. The equivalent word in the Zulu-Bantu language is khama. Various Bantu forms of kama are, khama, hama, or gama.

 

MAIN

1689

H

V

squeeze; wring

B C D E F G H J K L M N P R S

DER

1691

H

V

wring; squeeze

B C F G H J K L N R S

DER

1698

H

V

seize

 

 

Example 42

Gardiner 456, D49

Ancient Egyptian: amm to grasp

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: ama = clasp, join, connect or stick to, be attached to, cling

 

The Kiswahili-Bantu word ama has the following meanings, clasp, join, connect or join together. This is similar to the set of hieroglyphics shown below which has the extra m omitted. The two words thought spelt differently convey similar meanings.

 

Example 43

Budge 6a

Faulkner 3

Ancient Egyptian: am to seize, to grasp

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: ama = (same as above with one m)

Clasp, join, connect or stick together

 

am, burn up or burn of brazier. Notice the brazier with flame rising. The Kiswahili-Bantu word which matches this word is ama and means to dry by the application of fire.

 

    MOUNTAIN, BOUNDARY, LIMIT

Example 44

Budge 411a

Ancient Egyptian: ntchlimit, boundary

The Kiswahili-Bantu word ncha means, the point, tip, end, extremity. This can also be pronounced as nta. By extremity one means, limit, outer limit, end, boundary, farthest point. This is also given in the Setswana-Bantu language as Ntla, a point, an end, a tip, an apex. The word for point is derived from Proto-Bantu, see the table below.

MAIN

H (N (9/10))

point

389

 

pointe

 

Total Distribution:

Regions: 3: Ce NE SE

Zones: 5: E G J L S

MAIN

389

H

N (9/10)

point

E G J L S

 

Example 45

Gardiner 489, N26, James P allen472

Ancient Egyptian: djwmountain

Kiswahili-Bantu, jiwe, stone, rock, rocky hill, rocky mountain

The Kiswahili-Bantu word jiwe defines a stone, a rock, a hilly rocky mountain. The word for stone is derived from Proto-Bantu bue, see table below.

Proto-Bantu Table

MAIN

LL (N 5/6)

stone

285

 

pierre

 

Total Distribution:

Regions: 5: NW SW Ce NE SE

Zones: 13: C D E F G J K L M N P R S

MAIN

285

LL

N 5/6

stone

 

                                                             BLOCK UP

Example 46

Faulkner 321, Gardiner 604a

Ancient Egyptian: djba, stop up, block

Kiswahili-Bantu: ziba, means, to fill up a hole, stop up plug, dam, close, shut, block

Lingala-Bantu jipa, similar meanings

Luvale-Bantu: jika, similar meanings

Souther-Soto-Bantu: thiba, similar meanings

Notice the interchange between the endings, ba and pa in the words. Compare Ancient Egyptian jiba with Lingala-Bantu jipa.

It is becoming clear that the Ancient Egyptian word djba is another Bantu form and can be reconstructed to yield jiba. No doubt there exists a Bantu language which gives the exact Ancient Egyptian form.

UNDERSTANDING

Faulkner 303

Example 47

Ancient Egyptian: tjaw, tchaw book

The Kiswahili-Bantu word for a book is juwo, chuwo. However the word ‘to know’ or to ‘understand’ is given as jua. Thus the other form for the word for a book would be juawo.

Example 48

Antonio Loprieno 306, 125, 153, 200 Faulkner 151, Gardiner 37

James P Allan 462

Budge 430a

  

ELEKEA, EREKEA

 

TO KNOW, UNDERSTAND, TO BE CLEAR

 

Ancient Egyptian: rkhknow, become acquainted, understand or learn

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: elekea (erekea), know, perceive, comprehend and understand

 

The Ancient Egyptian language does not use the consonant l but instead substitutes it with consonant r. Thus consonants l and r are freely interchangeable without loss in meaning. This type of a substitution was carried out to decipher CLEOPATRA’S name where consonant r replaced consonant l in her name. CLEOPATRA’S name was spelt CREOPATRA in the Ancient Egyptian language. Thus the name CREOPATRA = CLEOPATRA.

 

The Ancient Egyptian word given by the consonants rkh is derived from the Kiswahili-Bantu word elea, be clear, be intelligible to one, that is understand what one says. This is also given by the Southern-Soto-Bantu language as ela, to become clear.

 

The Kiswahili-Bantu word elekea or elewa mean to understand, to know or realise. If the consonant l in the Kiswahili-Bantu word elekea is replaced by the consonant r, giving the word erekea instead of elekea, then one obtains the right Ancient Egyptian word which closely matches the Kiswahili-Bantu word. Thus ELEKEA = EREKEA.

  

Miscellaneous

 

Example 49

Faulkner 321

Ancient Egyptian: tchba garment

Kiswahili-Bantu: juba, an open coat or garment

Shona-Bantu juba, cut cloth with scissors

GO TO SLEEP

Example 50

Faulkner 133

Ancient Egyptian: nmago to sleep

Example 51

Budge 374b

Ancient Egyptian: nmto sleep, slumber

Example 52

Budge 374b

Ancient Egyptian: nmto repose, to sleep, to slumber

The above three examples may best be described by the Kiswahili-Bantu word nyamaa. The word means be silent, become quiet, peaceful, be still, at rest, calm, settled.

MISCELLANEOUS

Example 53

 

Faulkner 94

 

Ancient Egyptian     psi cook

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: upishi = cookery, cooking

 

Faulkner 94

 

The Ancient Egyptian word for cook psi is derived from the Proto-Bantu word pi, be burnt, be hot, be cooked, become ripe. The Kiswahili-Bantu word pika means cook, prepare by the use of fire. The form upishi means, cookery, cooking, the art of cooking, cuisine and m-pishi is a cook.

 

Example 54

Budge 772b

 

Ancient Egyptian: knn to be fat

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: kinene = big, thick, fat

 

Proto-Bantu table

MAIN

2289

L

V

be fat; ; be soft; be palatable

D F G H J L M N S

 

 

The Kiswahili-Bantu word kinene is derived from the word nene which means fat, big, stout, thick or plump. Proto-Bantu form non, be fat

 

Example 55

Budge 42a

Ancient Egyptian: ipahouse, dwelling

Kiswahili-Bantu: paa, roof of a house, dwelling. The word kipaa also defines the roof of a house.

It is interesting to observe that the Ancient Egyptian word ipaa has the initial prefix i. This is equivalent to the Kiswahili-Bantu prefix ki. Thus ipaa = kipaa 

KOMA- END 

Example 56

 

Gardiner 597, Budge 787b, Budge 770 a, Faulkner 286

 

Ancient Egyptian: km  to end, to finish, to complete

 

Kiswahili-Bantu: koma, cease, come to an end, bring to an end, close, complete

 

The proto-Bantu word kom means to kill. This is given as koma in the Kiswahili-Bantu language. Koma means to cease, put an end to, come to an end or kill. In the Luvale-Bantu language it is kuma. It also means conclusion. 

                                                                                                

References:

Civilisation and Barbarism by Cheik Anta Diop

Ancient Egypt and Black Africa by Theophile Obenga

Ancient Egyptian Grammar by Sir Alan Gardiner

A Concise Dictionary of Middle Egyptian by Raymond Faulkner

The Origin of Language by Merritt Ruhlen

Standard Shona Dictionary by M Hannan

Middle Egyptian by James P Allen

Ancient Egypt a Linguistic Introduction by Antonio Loprieno

A Dictionary of the Kiswahili Language by Rev. Dr. L. Krapf

Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphics Dictionary by W Budge

Kiswahili: People, Language, Literature by Assibi Apatewon Amidu

The Manifestation of Gender in some African languages by Lioba Moshi

Swahili Grammar by E. O. Ashton

Foundations in Southern African Linguistics edited by Robert K. Herbert

Luganda English dictionary by R.A Snoxall

Southern- Soto English dictionary by, R. A Paroz

Sesuto English Dictionary by Mabille

Northern Soto dictionary by T. J Kriel

Bemba English dictionary, White Fathers

Oshindonga English Dictionary by E. Tirronen

Oromo (Cushitic) English Dictionary by Tilahun Gamta

BLR 3 – Bantu Lexical Reconstructions 3

Languages of Africa by Joseph Greenberg

Black Athena by Martin Bernal

The Peopling Of Africa by James L. Newman

A Vocabulary Of Ici-Bemba by Malcolm Guthrie

The Children Of Woot by James Vansina

Africa Counts, Number and pattern in African Culture by CLAUDIA ZASLAVSKY.

Words and Meanings in Yoruba Religion by Modupe Oduyoye

Swahili Origins by James De Vere Allen

Adventures of English by Melvin Bragg

The Use and misuse of Language in the study of African History By Russell Schuh UCLA Department of Linguistics

 

Researched by Somo © August 27th 2008

 

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